Nestlé among first companies to sign up to supply chain initiative

By Caroline SCOTT-THOMAS contact

- Last updated on GMT

Nestlé is one of four firms to have signed up to the initiative, while a total of 82 have signalled their intention to do so
Nestlé is one of four firms to have signed up to the initiative, while a total of 82 have signalled their intention to do so

Related tags: Food supply chain, Vice president

Nestlé is among four companies to have officially registered with a Europe-wide initiative aiming to tackle unfair commercial practices in the food supply chain.

Eighty-two companies initially registered their intention to sign up to The Supply Chain Initiative when it was announced back in September. The initiative was set up by seven associations that represent different parts of the food supply chain, including FoodDrinkEurope, which represents the food and drink industry. Other associations include those representing branded goods manufacturers (AIM), the retail sector (the European Retail Round Table (ERRT), EuroCommerce, EuroCoop and Independent Retail Europe), and agricultural traders (CELCAA).    

Companies have to meet agreed criteria for joining before they can become official signatories.

Nestlé executive vice president and director of Zone Europe, Laurent Freixe, said: “The business to business framework marks an important step to build greater confidence in the fairness of the food supply chain. Our partners should sign up swiftly.”

The other companies that have already signed up are Moras & Comp., Concord Holding, and Wild Dairy Ingredients.

Speaking to FoodNavigator, project manager Jessica Imbert said: “It takes some time for companies to fully comply…We don’t want companies to sign up and then do nothing.”

More information on the initiative, including how to join and a list of companies that have signalled their intention to join, is available here​.

Related topics: Market Trends, Sustainability

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