Tooth-friendly label for low-calorie sweetener

- Last updated on GMT

Related tags: Dental caries

US company Spherix Incorporated reports that the US Food and Drug
Administration has allowed the claim that the low-calorie sweetener
tagatose does not cause tooth decay, and that it may actually
reduce the risk of this disease.

US company Spherix Incorporated reports that the US Food and Drug Administration has allowed the claim that the low-calorie sweetener tagatose does not cause tooth decay, and that it may actually reduce the risk of this disease.

According to the company, after studying test data, the FDA amended its regulation (21 CFR 101.80) to permit the labelling of tagatose to that effect.

The FDA commented: "Based on the totality of publicly available scientific evidence, we have now determined that the sugar D-tagatose ... is not fermented by oral bacteria to an extent sufficient to ... cause the erosion of dental enamel."

The FDA also examined scientific evidence from two human studies comparing the effects of D-tagatose to those of table sugar. Apparently D-tagatose produced less acid in the mouth, thereby reducing the risk of dental caries. "Therefore,"​ added the agency, "we have concluded that D-tagatose does not promote dental caries."

Spherix is confident that this action, effective with the FDA's announcement in the Federal Register(Volume 67, Number 231, 2 December, 2002), will boost the market appeal of food products made with tagatose. According to the company​ non-food products will also be targeted for the market place.

Earlier this year German sugar giant Nordzucker entered into a joint venture with Danish food group Arla Foods to produce tagatose, patented by US company Spherix. Following the construction of the first production facility for this full-bulk sweetener, Arla is planning to market tagatose by the summer of 2003.

Related topics: Policy

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