Survey reveals lack of knowledge about food safety equipment

- Last updated on GMT

Related tags: Food safety, Food

Food manufacturers are failing food hygiene inspections often
because they don't know where to turn for practical solutions,
according to research carried out by UK safety specialist Seton
today.

Food manufacturers are failing food hygiene inspections often because they don't know where to turn for practical solutions, according to research carried out by UK safety specialist Seton today.

The survey revealed that 71 per cent of respondents in the food manufacturing market said that they didn't know where to source all the products and services that they needed to ensure food safety compliance. Simple things, as mundane as safety signage, can be headache purchases for buyers, the survey revealed.

Recent figures from the Food Standards Agency reveal that in the Year 2000, 64 per cent of all food premises were inspected and 45 per cent country-wide committed some infringement of food safety law.

The company claims, however, the lack of information and services is hindering businesses in their hygiene objectives. In response to this finding, Seton is launching the country's first one-stop-shop for legal compliance, a comprehensive range of food safety and hygiene products.

Richard Boyes-Jackson, health and safety manager at S&A Foods comments: "Traditionally, the food manufacturing market has been neglected by suppliers offering a specific, food-based service, leaving us wasting time sourcing the products that we need from many different places - if we can get them at all. I've frequently found that the signs and equipment I need just aren't readily available - and S&A Foods are not unusual in this. There was a real gap in the market and I was really surprised that no one had tried to plug it before."

The launch of Seton's Food Safety range follows hot on the heels of the FSA's £20m food hygiene campaign, begun in February, which is bringing the issue of food safety to the fore in many food factories.

Seton managing director, Simon Keeping comments: "Whilst nearly all of our respondents were well aware of the need for compliance - and the risk that failure can bring to the public and their businesses - surprisingly few knew where to turn for an easy, practical way to identify and source what they needed to buy to put the essential elements in place."

Flexibility of supply was also a problem, the research highlighted, food manufacturers were not aware of a supplier that could service a production company of any size. Seton claims its own service, with no minimum order cost and complete product range, is suitable for companies employing three to 3,000 people.

Related topics: Food Safety & Quality

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