SUBSCRIBE

Breaking News on Food & Beverage Development - EuropeUS edition | APAC edition

News > Science

Read more breaking news

 

 

Fruit and veg can lower blood pressure according to reviewers

Post a commentBy Will Chu , 06-Apr-2017
Last updated on 06-Apr-2017 at 15:02 GMT2017-04-06T15:02:35Z

The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that hypertension is responsible for at least 51% of deaths due to stroke and 45% of deaths due to heart disease. ©iStock/photka
The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that hypertension is responsible for at least 51% of deaths due to stroke and 45% of deaths due to heart disease. ©iStock/photka

Increasing potassium-rich natural foods in the diet could reduce blood pressure and thus, cardiovascular and kidney disease, according to a review conducted in the US.

Dietary habits taken from several populations revealed a relationship between higher dietary potassium and lower blood pressure (BP), regardless of sodium intake.

Potassium, found in foods like sweet potatoes, avocados, spinach, beans, bananas and even coffee may also be a marker for other beneficial components of a ‘natural’ diet.

“Decreasing sodium intake is a well-established way to lower blood pressure," said Dr Alicia McDonough, professor of cell and neurobiology at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California (USC).

"But evidence suggests that increasing dietary potassium may have an equally important effect on hypertension."

Dr McDonough’s team recommended measures aimed at adding more potassium to the national diet that include making fruits and vegetables available at lower cost and more accessible via public policies.

For the food industry recommendations include developing food-processing technologies that retain the natural composition of cations, and a requirement for manufacturers to display potassium content on nutrition facts panels.

‘Potassium like a diuretic’

Bananas are a fruit considered rich in potassium. ©iStock

The review used a mix of population, interventional and molecular research that looked into the effects of dietary sodium and potassium on hypertension.

Of particular note were the interventional studies with potassium supplementation, which suggested that potassium provided a direct benefit.

"When dietary potassium is high, kidneys excrete more salt and water, which increases potassium excretion," Dr McDonough explained. "Eating a high potassium diet is like taking a diuretic."

Increasing dietary potassium will take a conscious effort, however. Modern diets have changed drastically with an emphasis on processed food with a high salt content. Processed foods, however are usually low in potassium.

One commentary included in the study noted that more than 75% of the sodium in the US diet was added during food processing and, thus, was difficult to control or assess.

"If you eat a typical Western diet your sodium intake is high and your potassium intake is low,” said Dr McDonough.

“This significantly increases your chances of developing high blood pressure. When dietary potassium is low, the balancing act uses sodium retention to hold onto the limited potassium, which is like eating a higher sodium diet,” she added.

Salt and potassium levels

Salt reduction is thought to be one of the most cost-effective strategies in preventing the onset of non-communicable diseases (NCDs).

Approached are usually formed around three central actions: reformulation of products; consumer increased awareness and education of consumers including better labelling; and closer monitoring of salt consumption within the population.

Countries such as Finland and the United Kingdom (UK) were early adopters of effective salt reduction programmes and many European countries have introduced effective measures since then.

The UK government’s current recommendation on salt consumption sets a limit for adults at less than 6 grams of salt a day (g/day).

The World Health Organisation (WHO) have said that current daily salt consumption in most European countries is estimated or measured to be 7–18 g/day, with no Member States meeting recommended levels.

A 2004 Institute of Medicine report recommends that adults consume at least 4.7 g of potassium per day to lower blood pressure, lower the impact of dietary sodium and reduce the risks of kidney stones and bone loss,

“Eating ¾ cup of black beans, for example, will help you achieve almost 50% of your daily potassium goal,” Dr McDonough said.

Source: American Journal of Physiology - Endocrinology And Metabolism

Published online ahead of print: DOI: 10.1152/ajpendo.00453.2016

“Cardiovascular benefits associated with higher dietary K vs. lower dietary Na evidence from population and mechanistic studies.”

Authors: Alicia A. McDonough, Luciana C. Veiras, Claire A. Guevara, Donna L. Ralph

Post a comment

Comment title *
Your comment *
Your name *
Your email *

We will not publish your email on the site

I agree to Terms and Conditions

These comments have not been moderated. You are encouraged to participate with comments that are relevant to our news stories. You should not post comments that are abusive, threatening, defamatory, misleading or invasive of privacy. For the full terms and conditions for commenting see clause 7 of our Terms and Conditions ‘Participating in Online Communities’. These terms may be updated from time to time, so please read them before posting a comment. Any comment that violates these terms may be removed in its entirety as we do not edit comments. If you wish to complain about a comment please use the "REPORT ABUSE" button or contact the editors.

Related products

Key Industry Events

 

Access all events listing

Our events, Shows & Conferences...