Pastry makers should brighten up, says Pidy

By Kacey Culliney

- Last updated on GMT

Color should be used more in patisserie, but manufacturers must also consider the production challenges that come with it, says Pidy
Color should be used more in patisserie, but manufacturers must also consider the production challenges that come with it, says Pidy

Related tags Shelf life Pastry

The patisserie world has not fully tapped into vibrant colors but should, a manager at Pidy says.

Cupcakes and macarons have made an incredible impact on the eye and pastries should do the same, said Robert Whittle, UK general manager for international pastry specialist Pidy.

“Use of bright colors is a growing trend but it’s an area that hasn’t really been tapped into by the pastry sector,”​ Whittle told BakeryandSnacks.com.

Consumers are looking for interesting, lively pastry products and color will appeal to many, particularly younger, more adventurous consumers, he said.

However, there are formulation and production challenges when using vibrant colors that must be considered, he warned.

Fading away under the spotlight

Patisserie products typically have a shelf life of around eight months, which means ingredients must be chosen carefully, Whittle said.

“You have to think not only of the taste and visual of now, but also how it will look and perform in eight months’ time.”

When it comes to making bright-colored pastry, the shelf life can be problematic because manufacturers have to find ingredients that not only blend well but can also “stand up to the rigors of light”​, he said.

Retaining color over a period of time is difficult, Whittle said. Similarly, working to prevent cross-contamination of colors on the production line and ensuring the color is retained during baking can also be difficult.

All of these challenges could be what is holding industry back, he added.

Less focus on color, more on spice

The shelf life challenge of maintaining color is what prompted Pidy to focus on spice and flavor, rather than color, for the launch of its most recent Spicy Cup line, Whittle explained.

Pidy's Spicy Cups use lighter oranges, yellows and reds
Pidy's Spicy Cups use lighter oranges, yellows and reds

Pidy has developed spice-infused patisserie cups that have light, rather than vibrant, colors.

“Whereas before we were selling the color aspect [with our Veggie Cups​], this time we’re selling the spices.”

“…As Pidy continues to play in the sector with colors, we’ll learn more as we go along and so will other manufacturers as they forage into this colorful arena.”

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