Finding the GMOs

- Last updated on GMT

Related tags: Dna, Gene expression, Molecular biology

Testimony to the increasing use of GMO detection equipment, four
laboratories across the world have licensed Genetic ID's
proprietary technology to detect genetically modified organisms
(GMOs) in agricultural and food products, the company reports this
week.

Testimony to the increasing use of GMO detection equipment, four laboratories across the world have licensed Genetic ID's proprietary technology to detect genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in agricultural and food products, the company reports this week.

The four laboratories based in Brazil, Asia and the US, join Genetic ID's Global Laboratory Alliance of GMO testing labs, which aims to provide consistent GMO testing to grain exporters and food manufacturers.

"We are very pleased that these four highly credible laboratories have joined our Global Laboratory Alliance, a network of eighteen expert laboratories that has established uniform standards,"​ said Genetic ID president Bill Thompson. "The Global laboratory Alliance has become a powerful force serving the food industry in the rapidly expanding global GMO testing market."

All four laboratories use Genetic ID's - the first laboratory to receive accreditation for GMO quantitative and varietal screening from the United Kingdom Accreditation Service (UKAS) - DNA-based, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technology to detect GMOs. The technology, claims the company, detects all commercialised GMOs and quantifies GM content in a wide range of raw crops, processed foods, and animal feed.

The four laboratories concerned are the Oregon Department of Agriculture's Export Service Center (ESC) in the US, the Laboratorio ALAC in Brazil, PSB Corporation in Singapore and Nisshin Environmental Planning in Japan.

Related topics: Science

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