Thailand working on GM labelling policy

Related tags Genetically modified organisms Food Gm

Soybeans, corn, potatoes and related products are considered
"high-risk" goods and will be targeted when mandatory
labelling of genetically...

Soybeans, corn, potatoes and related products are considered "high-risk"​ goods and will be targeted when mandatory labelling of genetically modified organisms (GMOs), expected by the end of this year, takes effect as part of Thailand's Public Health Ministry's measures to boost food safety, reports The Nation​. Chanin Chareonpong, an expert on food standards for the Thai ministry's Food and Drug Administration, said yesterday the ministry is accelerating consideration of a draft ministerial directive that would require all GM plants and products to be labelled. The directive is expected to be implemented by the end of this year. Rising concern about GM products has prompted the ministry to draw up more stringent measures to ensure food safety. So far, imports of GMOs, including plants and processed products, have been regulated under the ministry's Food and Drug Act BE2522. Under the new directive, engineered plants and food products made fully or partially from GM raw materials would be identified. In addition, important information such as percentage of GM content, potential for allergic reactions and complex ingredient mixtures will be required to be identified on the products' labels. "The appropriate level of GM mixtures allowed in such foods is being considered. The amount will be in the range of 3 to 5 per cent of the finished product,"​ Chanin said, adding that a ministry committee would consider the issue at a meeting on July 3. Currently, StarLink corn, manufactured in the US, is the only product to have been refused entry into Thailand as a genetically engineered food. StarLink corn reportedly causes allergic reactions in some consumers. Source: The Nation

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