US Meat Labelling Act explained

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Related tags: United states

In the United States the Country of Origin Meat Labelling Act of
2001 was introduced in the House and referred to the House
Committee on Agriculture on...

In the United States the Country of Origin Meat Labelling Act of 2001 was introduced in the House and referred to the House Committee on Agriculture on March 20, 2001. The bill, H.R. 1121, would amend the Agricultural Marketing Act of 1946 to require retailers of beef, lamb, and pork to inform consumers, at the final point of sale, of the country of origin of the commodities. According to the bill, U.S. designation of origin may only be used if the article is exclusively from an animal born, raised, and slaughtered in the United States. The bill would cover beef, lamb, and pork sold at retail, but exclude meat sold in a "food service establishment," including a restaurant, cafeteria, lunchroom, food stand, saloon, tavern, bar, lounge, or other similar facility operated as an enterprise engaged in the business of selling food to the public. The bill would require the country of origin to be available to consumers via a label, stamp, mark, placard, or other clear and visible sign on the covered commodity or on the package, display, holding unit, or bin containing the commodity at the final point of sale to consumers. Source: Lisa Van Wagner at Foodonline.com

Related topics: Policy

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