EU maintains animal to plant proteins should pose no problem

- Last updated on GMT

Related tags: European union

The European Commission on Monday presented its report on the
supply of plant proteins to satisfy the additional demand for plant
protein in animal feed....

The European Commission on Monday presented its report on the supply of plant proteins to satisfy the additional demand for plant protein in animal feed. The demand mainly stems from therecent ban on uses of processed animal proteins (PAP) in farmed livestock feed adopted by the Council in December 2000 to reinforce guarantees to consumers on the safety of their food. The Commission​ concluded that to promote the cultivation of plant proteins in the EU would be either excessively costly, have particular WTO implications or would not be well suited to replace PAP. In a statement the Commission stressed that there is no major problem to replace protein from animal meal by protein from plants. In the immediate future, the main substitutes for PAP will be cereals and soya meal. The ban on PAP in feed will not lead to any shortage of protein in the EU or on the world markets. Should the markets become short because of other reasons in the longer run (e.g. unexpected increases in world demand or reductions of supply) prices would increase and set strong incentives to increase production of oilseeds and protein crops, in the EU and elsewhere. However, for the near future oil meals will be widely available on the market and it is probable that prices will decrease rather than increase. The statement concluded that the ban should not give rise to the introduction of new or more costly support schemes for plant proteins in the EU.

Related topics: Policy

Related news

Follow us

Featured Events

View more

Products

View more

Webinars