Health reflects global inequalities

- Last updated on GMT

Related tags: British medical journal, Ethics, Medicine

Global inequities in health is the number one ethical issue of our
age, argues bioethicist Peter Singer in this weeks issue of the
British Medical Journal....

Global inequities in health is the number one ethical issue of our age, argues bioethicist Peter Singer in this weeks issue of the British Medical Journal. In the editorial BMJ​stresses the fact that pharmaceutical companies are under increasing pressure to make their drugs affordable in the developing world and to produce drugs for the conditions that are unique to the developing world. Drugs for treating HIV infection are unaffordable to most of the world's poor, and yet they can stop the disease from killing. Countries like South Africa, Brazil, and India are responding by producing generic versions of patented drugs. Pharmaceutical companies take action against them, and the rich and poor worlds collide. A more fundamental problem for developing countries is a clean water supply. In Bangladesh wells were sunk to supply biologically clean water, but the geology of the rock means that the water contains arsenic and the people are poisoned. The problem is also seen in China, Mexico,Argentina, and Chile. The editorial finishes with a reminder that about 98 per cent of the 3.43 million adult deaths related to poor reproductive health occur in the developing world. The work of international agencies has been severely disrupted by President Bush prohibiting the use of US funds by anyagency offering abortion related services. To read more visit the British Medical Journal​.

Related topics: Science

Follow us

Products

View more

Webinars