Fish reduces stroke risk in women, new evidence

- Last updated on GMT

Related tags: Omega-3 fatty acid, Ischemic stroke

Eating fish, even in small amounts, can significantly reduce a
woman's risk of the most common type of stroke, a major new study
suggests. A study...

Eating fish, even in small amounts, can significantly reduce a woman's risk of the most common type of stroke, a major new study suggests. A study in the US of nearly 80,000 women found that eating fish was linked to reductions in the risk of ischemic, or clot-related, strokes, which account for about 83 per cent of all strokes. Women who ate about 4 ounces of fish two to four times weekly cut their risk of ischemic stroke by 48 per cent. Slightly higher risk reductions were found in women who ate fish five or more times weekly. Omega-3 fatty acids, found in most fish, have been shown to lower levels of blood fats linked to cardiovascular disease and to help keep blood from clotting. The fats can be found in dark, oily fish such as mackerel, salmon and sardines. Flaxseed oil is also a rich source. Full findings are published in the January 17, 2001 issue of Journal of the American Medical Association.

Related topics: Science

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