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A tremendous error

The problem is not the execution, the problem is the tax as such. It is a medevial belief that fat becomes fat in the body. A recent congress of the German Society for fat research showed that fat is the least significant reason for obesity. If it were not so we would not have the American paradox: the less fat they eat the bigger they become.

It is simple, it is not at all about public health, it is about raising money. Not more and also not less.

Posted by Prof. Dr. Michael Bockisch
31 August 2012 | 19h50

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