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Being anti-GMO may have ‘intuitive appeal’

Rejection of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) may be intuitive for many people, claims a paper published in the journal Trends in Plant Science.

New Zealand

Student investigates 400-year-old herbal text for modern lessons

The University of Canterbury’s school of health sciences is conducting ground-breaking research into a Renaissance medico-pharmaceutical text that could hold invaluable recipes for healthy nutrition.

'Serious implications for public health': Study finds organic milk contains a third less iodine

Organic milk contains nearly a third less iodine than conventionally-produced fresh milk, a British study has found.

Ethical foods make consumers feel morally superior - and food taste better

The feeling of moral satisfaction that consumers get from eating ethical food change their taste experience for the better - and means they are willing to pay more, according to...

Nestlé files all-natural heat resistant chocolate patent

Nestlé has filed a patent for heat-resistant chocolate made by adding fibre from sources such as wheat or citrus fruits.

‘Bust the myth’ of physical inactivity and obesity, urge researchers

Public health messages intended to tackle obesity should focus on unhealthy eating rather than physical activity, which does not promote weight loss, according to an editorial published in the British Journal...

Wanting isn’t liking: Glutamates increase intake but not appreciation of new flavours

Glutamates can be used to increase intake of food containing novel flavours  - although it does not necessarily mean people will like those flavours, researchers have unexpectedly found.

Food and human nutrition expert: 'We can learn from the US and Denmark'

Whole grain struggle: One-fifth of UK consumers don’t eat any

The UK needs more whole grain products and daily intake recommendations to drive consumption up to healthy levels, says an expert.

Sugar reduces stress more than aspartame, say scientists

Sugar-sweetened drinks may reduce stress levels and therefore be harder to reduce than aspartame say scientists - but campaigners are still calling on industry to reduce both.

Ethical halos: Is there an additional value to CSR activities?

While CSR activities have been long suggested to improve public relations in general, new research has found that consumers rate products produced by companies with good CSR as a better...

Sound: The forgotten flavour sense?

Flavour perception is strongly influenced by the sounds heard when foods are bitten and chewed, claims a review published in Flavour.

Junk foods start to impact metabolism after just five days, warn researchers

Just five days of eating extra amounts of fatty foods can cause long-lasting metabolic changes that alter how muscles process nutrients, new research has found.

Junk food ads and brand placement: Joint use increases effect on children

The combined use of TV brand placements with advertising could increase the effect on children's brand awareness and behaviour towards junk food, a new study has said.

Report and industry clash over artificial sweeteners' role in childhood obesity

A new research report has said that artificial sweeteners may not help reduce obesity in children – a claim that the industry has dismissed.

Changing food porosity could cut salt and fat

Salt and fat content in processed food could be reduced by altering food pore size - without affecting the taste, say scientists.

Small changes for big benefits: Altering protein and carb profile has big impact on weight

Making small, consistent changes to the types of protein- and carbohydrate-rich foods we eat may have a big impact on long-term weight, say researchers behind a new large-scale diet study.

Pesticide exposure linked to increased heart attack risk in obese women

Pesticide exposure could contribute to an increased risk for heart attacks and inflammation in obese premenopausal women, a new study has found.

Eco-friendly foods: Can environmental messages be better targeted to consumers?

Research outlining why consumers support environmental food policies could help identify how messages should be targeted to different groups.

Food labels: Using emoticons better than using colour?

Emoticons on nutritional labels could have stronger impacts on perceptions of snacks than colour-coded labels, a study has claimed.

Cheese: The latest piece of the French paradox puzzle?

The body digests fermented dairy products like cheese differently from butter, leading researchers to suggest this may be another reason behind the French paradox.

Food preferences among elderly peers may differ, says study

Older adults with a poor appetite may have a higher preference for variation in foods compared with older adults with a good appetite, according to a study.

Do eating habits of others influence healthy eating in young women?

Healthy eating behaviour in young women could be influenced by the eating habits and the appearance of others, a study has found.

Near zero compliance with WHO sodium and potassium guidelines

As a 16,000-strong four-nation survey finds only 0.5% meet guidelines at best, researchers say education and individual action is not enough to ensure compliance – industry reformulation for sodium is needed.

Eating eggs linked to lower diabetes risk, says study

Eating four eggs a week could lower the risk of type 2 diabetes in men, a study has claimed.

Taste beyond the tongue: How do other senses influence flavour?

Taste is much more complex than the experience of basic flavours on the tongue – it also encompasses our other senses to a larger degree than most people realise, according...