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Treatt launches sweet spearmint flavour ingredient

By Guy Montague-Jones , 05-Aug-2010

Treatt has launched a new flavour ingredient for the drinks market that the company claims offers a sweeter alternative to conventional spearmint oil.

The UK-based supplier to the flavour and fragrance industry claims the new Spearmint Treattarome 9764 imparts the aroma of freshly crushed native spearmint leaves, giving off topnotes reminiscent of the Mojito cocktail drink. At the same time, Treatt also described the flavour ingredient, which is sold to flavour companies rather than drink manufacturers, as “conferring a refreshing candy-like spearmint flavour.”

Clarifying the sweetness point, a Treatt spokesperson said: “The product does not enhance sweetness to a measurable degree. It leaves a sweeter impression than spearmint oil, probably because it is lighter in character and has no still notes.”

Wholly distilled from the spearmint plant, Mentha spicata, Treattarome 9764 is what the company calls a 100 per cent natural FTNF (From The Named Food) clear distillate.

Applications

The flavour ingredient, which is water soluble, is particularly suited to clear beverages, according to Treatt, and works well in juices, dairy drinks and alcoholic beverages.

Typical uses for spearmint, currently in the marketplace, include Mojito drinks, spearmint schnapps, flavoured water and Moroccan teas and other tea blenders. Cott Beverages has even developed Fortifido – a spearmint flavoured fresh breath water formulated for dogs.

What flavour profile is achieved with Treattarome 9764 depends on the dosage levels used. At 0.20 per cent, for example, Treatt said its new ingredient creates a strong spearmint character with a fresh Mojito topnote, while at a lower dose of 0.0025 per cent, a cooler, more refreshing flavour is the result.

The Treattarome 9764 is the latest addition to Treatt’s range of Treattarome FTNF water soluble distillates. Treatt said these products are made using a short duration, low temperature distillation process, which ensures the distillate retains the character of the original, fresh food.

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