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Symrise expands Taste for Life across the health-pleasure spectrum

By Jess Halliday , 21-Sep-2010

Symrise is rolling out a new evolution of its Taste for Life platform that underscores product development and customer dealings, covering the spectrum of consumer asks from health to pleasure.

The flavour and fragrance firm first introduced Taste for Life in 2006 as a framework for developing new products more rapidly, and in tune with market needs.

The platform was originally introduced for use when developing solutions for products geared towards meeting the drive towards products with a healthier composition or perception, such as reduced fat, sugar and salt, all-natural, or authentic.

Since then, however, consumer demands have shifted, and with them the agendas of food manufacturers catering to them.

The new Taste for Life platform stretches from ‘holistic health’ at one end, to ‘pure pleasure’ at the other. This means there are now two new ‘pillars’ representing consumer desires. On the one hand, there is a greater drive towards products with functional health benefits, and on the other products that bring exciting new sensations.

“Whatever you want to do with a product, taste is central,” Heinrich Schaper, president of the flavour and nutrition division EMEA, told FoodNavigator.com. He added that in each of the above categories, work will be required to address taste considerations – and no consumers are prepared to make no compromises.

Crucially, Taste for Life is not a product range but a strategy underscoring the company’s work. “Taste for Life is Symrise,” Schaper said.

The pillars have been identified by Symrise’s market intelligence units. Marketing manager Bernhard Kott said that the ranges food and beverage companies are putting together now tend to be clustered under at least these five pillars.

In addition to this approach of catering to identified trends, Symrise also looks to engage with its customers “eye to eye” at the high level, where their nutritional boards are advising on positioning. It can then phase in a research plan that can address flavour requirements in step with new product directions.

Not just lip service

Schaper said the expanded Taste for Life platform is “not just lip service” but has clear operational links.

For instance, the Kaden Biochemicals, acquired in 2006, now occupies a dedicated global business unit for selling functional ingredients.

It also has a competence centre to support technical understanding and regulatory compliance across all divisions.

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